How Developing Nations Can Provide Reliable Water Supply to Their Urban Populations

There is one major problem that developing nations face, namely the problem of providing reliable water supply to their urban populations. You can only get to agree with this statement if you have lived (as an ordinary citizen) in a city within a developing nation – especially the nations in Africa and South East Asia. Then you will have had to grapple with the challenges brought about by unreliable water supply. You will have gotten a chance to know what it means to go for weeks without water in your taps. You will have gotten a chance to know what it means to buy water from vendors, who normally charge a premium for the product (a product whose safety can’t be entirely vouched for in any event)…

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Having established that one of the major challenges that developing nations face is that of providing a reliable water supply to their urban populations, a question arises as to what can be done to solve the problem. To my mind, the main thing that the developing nations can do, to provide reliable water supply to their urban populations, is to maximize on the rainfall. This is to say that measures need to be put in place, to ensure that whenever rain falls, the water is captured before it runs off into the seas or into the lakes. And the main way that this can be done is through the construction of large-scale dams on rivers.

Of course, beyond the investment in the construction of dams, more work needs to be done in setting up water treatment plans and reliable supply lines. The main challenge that the developing nations face is that of getting adequate funds to set up water management systems that are large enough for their populations. But in this day and age, when water is being sold as a commodity, there is no reason as to why that should be hard. It is really just a question of investing the money that people pay as water bills into the setting up of adequate water supply infrastructure.

How to Get People to Take Water Conservation More Seriously

It is clear that people don’t take water conservation seriously. You will agree with this statement when you get to see just how much water goes to waste in domestic, commercial and industrial settings. That is where, at least in my experience, the amount of water that goes to waste is often actually more than that which is used in the right way. And this is worrying, given the fact that water is a limited resource, which needs to be conserved. So the question that comes up is as to what can be done, to get people to take water conservation more seriously.

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To my mind, there are two approaches that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously. In the rest of this blog post, I am going to be describing those two approaches, which can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously.

The first approach that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously is the coercive approach. This is where you basically ‘force’ the people to take water conservation more seriously. It is something you quite easily can do by hiking water tariffs: which would then force people to conserve water, lest they be confronted with astronomical water bills.

The second approach that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously is the persuasive approach. This is where you enlighten people on the need for water conservation, and then try to persuade them to take water conservation more seriously. You can do so through various awareness campaigns. Admittedly, this remains a tall order: because the human nature is such that people can only do things well when there is some coercive force at play. Still, there are cases where people have been nicely persuaded to do things. To give an example which may seem to be a bit far off, you just need to look at a company like Kroger: the one that runs the supermarket chain. Then you will be able to see that Kroger is usually able to get people to take part in its online surveys that are run on the Kroger feedback site, without any coercion whatsoever. If a company like that can be successful at persuading people to take part in its online surveys, there is no reason as to why a water supply company can’t be more successful at persuading its clients to take water conservation more seriously. It is just that the persuasive approach takes more time and energy than the coercive approach.

Resources

  1. University of Georgia
  2. Online Guide

Setting Up a Water Management System for an Industrial Plant

I was recently approached by a gentleman who was a friend when we were at the engineering school a few years ago. The fellow had apparently gotten a contract to set up a water management system for an industrial plant, and he was seeking my help in the endeavor. I told him that I was open to the deal, and then asked him what the terms for our partnership would be. He replied by saying that he would be taking me on as his employee. I found that unacceptable, given the fact that I would have preferred to be a partner to him in this endeavor.

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I would have preferred to a partner because I knew that given his skill level and his work ethic, I would, in any event, end up doing most of the work. As a partner, I would at least have had the chance to share in the profits. As an employee, I would have had to accept a pittance, in the name of a salary from him: leaving him to pocket the bulk of the money. So we parted ways, and I hear that he has ended up losing the contract because, just as I feared, he couldn’t handle the work on his own…

That experience nonetheless got me thinking about the intrigues of setting up a water management system for an industrial plant. I found myself recalling the components that need to be put in place, when setting up a water management system for an industrial plant: which I will be (very briefly) sharing with the readers of my blog in today’s blog post.

In setting up a water management system for an industrial plant, the first component you have to establish is that of the water supply. This can be from the national or local pipeline. Or if it is a particularly big industrial plant, this can entail setting up a dam for the purpose. At another level, if it is a small plant, but in a place that is far from the national or local pipeline, the establishment of water supply may be through the drilling of a borehole.

The second component that you have to establish is that of water distribution. Once you have the water supply to the plant, you have to set up an elaborate system, to get the water to all parts of the industrial plant where it is needed.

The third component that you have to establish is that of waste water management. To this end, you may need to have a system for treating the water, before it is allowed to flow into the natural water bodies. This is also the point where you may need to have a system for recycling the water, so that it can be re-used in the plant, rather than just letting it go to waste.