How to Get People to Take Water Conservation More Seriously

It is clear that people don’t take water conservation seriously. You will agree with this statement when you get to see just how much water goes to waste in domestic, commercial and industrial settings. That is where, at least in my experience, the amount of water that goes to waste is often actually more than that which is used in the right way. And this is worrying, given the fact that water is a limited resource, which needs to be conserved. So the question that comes up is as to what can be done, to get people to take water conservation more seriously.

Water Conservation edu

To my mind, there are two approaches that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously. In the rest of this blog post, I am going to be describing those two approaches, which can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously.

The first approach that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously is the coercive approach. This is where you basically ‘force’ the people to take water conservation more seriously. It is something you quite easily can do by hiking water tariffs: which would then force people to conserve water, lest they be confronted with astronomical water bills.

The second approach that can be used to get people to take water conservation more seriously is the persuasive approach. This is where you enlighten people on the need for water conservation, and then try to persuade them to take water conservation more seriously. You can do so through various awareness campaigns. Admittedly, this remains a tall order: because the human nature is such that people can only do things well when there is some coercive force at play. Still, there are cases where people have been nicely persuaded to do things. To give an example which may seem to be a bit far off, you just need to look at a company like Kroger: the one that runs the supermarket chain. Then you will be able to see that Kroger is usually able to get people to take part in its online surveys that are run on the Kroger feedback site, without any coercion whatsoever. If a company like that can be successful at persuading people to take part in its online surveys, there is no reason as to why a water supply company can’t be more successful at persuading its clients to take water conservation more seriously. It is just that the persuasive approach takes more time and energy than the coercive approach.

Resources

  1. University of Georgia
  2. Online Guide